Holy Motors: Holy Shit!

Holy Motors: Holy Shit!

How do I write a whole article about a movie, like “Holy Motors,” that resists critical interpretation? Where do I go when even the director, Leos Carax, willfully guards himself from interviews? I hate the New Yorker review and Google isn’t helping, so I’m at a loss.

Here, I have an idea: Please allow me a paragraph to type out whatever comes to my mind, and maybe I’ll find something in there that’ll help me out with this.

Boyhood Calling

Boyhood Calling

I don’t remember much of my childhood. It’s kind of sad, and honestly a little scary when I dwell on it. All of that time spent developing and growing up, and it’s nothing but a patchy series of half-memories to me! I was so unaware of how important and yet temporary it all was — and really, we’re all guilty of this. It’s retrospective thoughts like these that lead adults to get on one knee and drop meaningless pearls of wisdom to 8 year olds that “childhood doesn’t last forever,” and that “you’ll miss this,” as if the kid is suddenly going to develop some constant temporal awareness that allows them to perfectly savor childhood so that they won’t grow up saying the same shit. We struggle to comprehend ourselves and where we came from. We vaguely recall growing up, but only from a more world-weary vantage point where we almost speak about our past experiences apologetically. But right now we at Reed are more focused on retaining Deleuzian critical theory and chemical equations to dwell too much on how uniquely odd it is that we even got to where we are. So what’s to be done about it?

Russian Ark

December 23, 2001 is the last chance for Russian director Alexander Sokurov. Holed up inside St. Petersburg’s State Hermitage Museum, an exhausted camera crew, two thousands actors in period costume, and three orchestras are waiting for the signal to start. This is the one fact that everyone who has heard of “Russian Ark” knows even before watching it: this movie was filmed entirely in one take. Using a Steadicam to stabilize the shot, the whole 96-minute movie was filmed and saved, uncompressed, onto a hard disk. No cuts, no transitions; this is the most realistic movie I’ve seen. 

Warner Brothers Builds Kids' Movie for Adults

Phil Lord and Chris Miller, directors of the Warner Brother’s “The LEGO Movie,” met each other at Dartmouth College. After being rejected for an animation job for “The Rugrats Movie”(1998) they began focusing their efforts on writing. Lord wrote for “How I Met Your Mother” starting in 2005 and alongside Miller directed the incredibly successful comedy “21 Jump Street”(2012). Their latest effort “The LEGO Movie,” in theaters now, is a hilarious 100-minute avalanche of virtual action scenes, pop-culture references, and successful satire that pours out of the screen and onto the audience. While the movie is aimed at children, the comedy is rife with subtle and subversive in-jokes that only older viewers will understand. Reminiscent of cartoons from the late nineties and the early aughts, many of the jokes rely on the ridiculousness of daily life in metropolitan America and the vapidity of prevailing social fads to achieve their impact.